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Posts Tagged ‘medulla’

Neuronal Connections in the Cerebellum in Short

January 13, 2013 3 comments

Control of movement is largely determined by incoming (afferent) and outgoing (efferent) neural impulses in the cerebellum.

Motor information input travels from the spinal cord, cerebral cortex and vestibular system via mossy fibers.

Feedback regarding movements returns to the cerebellum via the inferior olivary nucleus in the medulla oblongata. This feedback loop allows the brain to coordinate movement.

All outgoing neural impulses from the cerebellum travel via the deep cerebellar and vestibular nuclei. Proper functioning of the neuronal pathway between mossy fibers, granular cells, parallel fibers, climbing fibers and Purkinje cells are thought to be essential for coordinated muscular movement. Glutamate is a neurotransmitter in the excitatory synapses between climbing fibers and Purkinje cells as well as between granular cells and mossy fibers. Disruptions in this system are thought to be involved in a variety of movement disorders.

Cerebellar connections(click on the picture to view full size)

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N.Vagus

July 15, 2010 3 comments

An article on vagus nerve.

A link to the article: N.Vagus – click here

The vagus nerve is the tenth cranial nerve. It has the most extensive distribution of any of the cranial nerves and contains sensory, motor and parasympathetic fibers. The vagus emerges from the brain stem at the medulla oblongata, between the olive and the inferior cerebellar peduncle. It exits the cranium through the jugular foramen with the glossopharyngeal and accessory nerves. The vagus nerve has two ganglia, the superior and inferior ganglia. The superior ganglion lies within the jugular foramen. The inferior ganglion is situated just below. Just below the inferior ganglion, the vagus is joined by the cranial part of the accessory nerve. The vagus then passes downwards within the carotid sheath and enters the thorax at the root of the neck.