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The Reticular Formation, Limbic System and Basal Ganglia

February 19, 2012 2 comments

The Reticular Formation

It’s a ‘diffuse net’ which is formed by nerve cells and fibers. It extends from the neuroaxis spinal cord through medulla, pons, midbrain, subthalamus, hypothalamus and thalamus (spinal cord is relayed superiorly to the cerebral cortex).

Many afferent and efferent pathways project in and out of the RF from most parts of the CNS. The main pathways through the RF is poorly defined and difficult to trace using silver stains. Reticular formation can be divided into three columns : median, medial and lateral columns.

Functions of the Reticular formation

1.   Control of skeletal muscles:

  • RF modulates muscle tone and reflex activities (via reticulospinal and reticulo bulbar tracts). It is important in controlling muscles of facial expression when associated with emotions.

2.   Control somatic and visceral sensation (influence can be excitatory or inhibitory)

3.   Control of autonomic nervous system

4.   Control of endocrine nervous system (hypothalamus and the pituitary)

5.   Influence on the biological clock (rhythm)

6.   The reticular activating system (arousal and level of consciousness are controlled by the RF)

Clinical note

When a person smiles for a joke, the motor control is provided by the RF on both side of the brain. The fibers from RF is separated from corticobulbar pathway (supply for facial muscles). If a patient suffers a stroke that involves corticobulbar fibers, he or she has facial paralysis on the lower part of the face, but is still able to smile symmetrically.

The Limbic System

 Limbic structures   Functions of the limbic system 
  1. Sub callosal, cingulated and parahippocampal gyri
  2. Hippocampal formation
  3. Amygdaloid nucleus
  4. Mammillary bodies
  5. Anterior thalamic nucleus
1. Influence the emotional behavior:a. Reaction to fear and angerb. Emotions associated with sexual behavior

2. Hippocampus is involved in converting short term memory to long term memory (If the hippocampus is damaged, patient is unable to store long term memory – Anterograde amnesia)

The  Basal Ganglia and their connections

Connections of the Basal Ganglia

Yellow arrow : Pallidofugal fibers

Caudate nucleus and the Putamen: main sites of receiving inputs

Globus pallidus: main site from which output leaves

Afferent and Efferent fibers

Connections of the caudate nucleus and Putamen Connections of the Globus pallidus
Afferent Efferent Afferent Efferent
CS: CorticostriateTS: Thalamostriate

NS: Nigrostriate

BS: Brainstem striatal fibers

SP: Striatopallidalfibers

SN: Striatonigral fibers

SP: Striatopallidalfibers Pallidofugalfibers

Functions of  the Basal Nuclei

Basal Nuclei controls muscular movements by influencing the cerebral cortex (it doesn’t have direct control through descending pathways to the brainstem and spinal cord). It helps to prepare for the movements (enables the trunk and limbs to be placed in appropriate positions before discrete movements of the hands and feet).

Functional connections of the Basal Nuclei and how they influence muscle activities

 
REFERENCES: 
1. Ben Greenstein, Ph.D, Adam Greenstein, BSc (Hons) Mb, ChB Color Atlas of Neuroscience
2. Allan Siegel Ph.D, Hreday N. Sapru Ph.D Essential Neuroscience, 1st Edition
3. Stanley Jacobson, Elliot M. Marcus Neuroanatomy for the Neuroscientist
4. Patrick f. Chinnery Neuroscience for Neurologists
5. Dale Purves Neuroscience, 3rd Edition
6. Suzan Standring Gray’s Anatomy
7. Keith L. Moore, Arthur F. Dalley, Anne M. R. Agur Clinically Oriented Anatomy
8. Frank H. Netter Atlas of Human Anatomy
9. Walter J. Hendelman, M.D., C.M. Atlas of Functional Neuroanatomy
10. Mark F. Bear, Barry W. Connors, Michael A. Paradiso Neuroscience Exploring the Brain
11. Dale Purves et al. Principles of Cognitive Neuroscience
12. Eric R. Kandel et al. Principles of Neural Science
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Right And Left Brain

February 17, 2012 1 comment

The brain is divided physically into a left and right half is not a new discovery. The Egyptians knew that the left side of the brain controlled and received sensations from the right side of the body and vice versa.

It is only in the last two dozen years, however, that the true implication of the left/right split has gradually become apparent, through the work of a number of researchers. The most famous are probably Dr.  Roger Sperry and Dr. Robert Ornstein of the California Institute of Technology. Their work has won them a Nobel prize.

Sperry and Ornstein noted that the left and the rig hemispheres are connected by an incredibly complex  network of up to 300 million nerve fibres called the Corpus callosum. They were also able to show that the two halves of the brain tend to have different functions.

They (and other researchers) indicate that the left brain primarily appears to deal with language and mathematical processes and logical thought, sequences, analysis and what we generally label academic  pursuits. The right brain principally deals with music, and visual impressions, pictures, spatial patterns, and colour recognition. They also ascribe to the right brain the ability to deal with certain kinds of conceptual   thought – intangible ‘ideas’ such as love, loyalty, beauty.

The specialization of the two halves of the brain can result in some bizarre behaviour. Patients who, for medical reasons, have had their Corpus callosum  severed,  have effectively two semi-independent brains: two minds in one head.

If a ball is shown to the left visual field of such a person, i.e. registered to their right brain hemisphere, the speaking half of the brain, which is in the other, (left) brain will claim to have seen nothing. If, however, the patient is asked to feel in a bag of assorted shapes he will correctly pull out a ball. If he is asked what he has done he will say ‘nothing’. The ball has only been seen with the right brain, and felt with the right brain. The speech centre, which is located in the left brain, has registered nothing.

Even more delicate experiments have been performed on surgically split-brained patients. The word SINBAD was projected to such a patient while his eyes were focused on the precise spot between N and B. The first 3 letters went to his right brain, the last three to his left hemisphere. When asked to saywhat he had seen, he replied BAD. When asked to point with his left hand to what he had seen he pointed to the word SIN.

The specialisation of the two brains  has also been demonstrated by measuring the electrical activity of the brain during various activities.

When the brain is relaxed in a state of rest, it tends predominantly to show an alpha brain wave rhythm – i.e. 8-12 Hz waves. Ornstein found that a subject tackling a mathematical problem showed an increase in alpha in the right hemisphere. This indicated that the right side was relaxing whilst the left was active and, therefore, in a beta brain wave pattern. In contrast, when a subject was matching coloured patterns, the left showed alpha (i.e. was resting) and the right showed beta (i.e. was active). More on brain waves can be found here.

The brain scans, show the varying levels of electrical brain activity in a subject listening to music, words and singing. The first activity (music) involved the right brain. The second (listening to words only) involved the  left brain, but singing (words and music together) involved the whole brain.

The left brain is now thought to be the half that specialises in serial, sequential thought, i.e. analysing  information in sequence in a ”logical” step by step approach. The left rationalises. The right brain seems to take in several bits of information ”at a glance” and process them into one overall thought. The right synthesises.

To read more click on this link to the full article: Right and Left Brain

Descending Tracts

February 17, 2012 Leave a comment

Descending tracts have three neurons:

1.   1st order neurons (UMN): cell bodies are in the cerebral cortex and other supra spinal areas

2.   2nd order neurons: short and situated in the anterior grey column of the spinal cord

3.  3rd  order neuron (LMN): situated in the anterior grey column and innervate the skeletal muscles through anterior roots of the spinal nerves

Corticospinal tract: rapid, skilled and voluntary movements

1st order neuron

Axons arise from the pyramidal cells of the cerebral  cortex  (situated  in  the  5th   layer),  2/3 from the pre central gyrus and 1/3 from the post central gyrus:

1. 1/3 of fibers arise from the 1stry motor  cortex (Area 4)

2. 1/3 of fibers arise from the 2ndry motor cortex (Area 6)

3. 1/3 of fibers arise from the parietal lobe

(Area 1, 2 and 3).

Descending fibers converge in the corona radiata and  pass  though  the   posterior  limb  of  the internal capsule; organization of fibers within the internal capsule:

1. close to genu (medial): concerned with the cervical parts of the body

2. away from the genu (lateral): concerned with the lower extremity.

The tract then passes through the middle 3/5 of the basis pedunculi of the midbrain; organization of fibers in the midbrain:

    1. medially: cervical parts of the body
    2. laterally: lower limbs.

When the tract enters the pons, it’s broken into many bundles by the transverse pontocerebellar fibers. In the medulla oblongata, the bundles group together to form the pyramids. At the junction of the MO and the spinal cord, most fibers cross the midline at the decussation of the pyramids and enter the lateral white column of the spinal cord to form the lateral corticospinal tract (LCST). LCST descends length of the spinal cord and terminates in the anterior grey column of all the spinal segments.

The fibers which didn’t cross, descend in the anterior white column of the spinal cord as the anterior corticospinal tract (ACST). Fibers of the ACST eventually cross and terminate in the anterior grey column of the spinal cord segments in the cervical and upper thoracic regions.

2nd order neuron:

It’s an internuncial neuron.

3rd order neuron:

It’s a alpha or gamma motor neuron.

To read more click on this link to the full article: Descending Tracts