Home > Virology > Pathogenesis and Epidemiology of Orthomyxoviruses

Pathogenesis and Epidemiology of Orthomyxoviruses


Pathogenesis and Immunity

Influenza initially establishes a local upper respiratory tract infection. To do so, the virus first targets and kills mucus-secreting, ciliated, and other epithelial cells, causing the loss of this primary defense system. NA facilitates the development of the infection by cleaving sialic acid residues of the mucus, thereby providing access to tissue. Preferential release of the virus at the apical surface of epithelial cells and into the lung promotes cell-to-cell spread and transmission to other hosts. If the virus spreads to the lower respiratory tract, the infection can cause severe desquamation (shedding) of bronchial or alveolar epithelium down to a single-cell basal layer or to the basement membrane.

In addition to compromising the natural defenses of the respiratory tract, influenza infection promotes bacterial adhesion to the epithelial cells. Pneumonia may result from a viral pathogenesis or from a secondary bacterial infection. Influenza may also cause a transient or low-level viremia but rarely involves tissues other than the lung.

Histologically, influenza infection leads to an inflammatory cell response of the mucosal membrane, which consists primarily of monocytes and lymphocytes and few neutrophils. Submucosal edema is present. Lung tissue may reveal hyaline membrane disease, alveolar emphysema, and necrosis of the alveolar walls

Interferon and cytokine responses peak at almost the same time as virus in nasal washes and are concomitant with the febrile phase of disease. T-cell responses are important for effecting recovery and immunopathogenesis. However, influenza infection depresses macrophage and T-cell function, hindering immune resolution. Interestingly, recovery often precedes detection of antibody in serum or secretions.

Protection against reinfection is primarily associated with the development of antibodies to HA, but antibodies to NA are also protective. The antibody response is specific for each strain of influenza, but the cell-mediated immune response is more general and is capable of reacting to influenza strains of the same type (influenza A or B virus). Antigenic targets for T-cell responses include peptides from HA but also from the nucleocapsid proteins (NP, PB2) and M1 protein. The NP, PB2, and M1 proteins differ considerably for influenza A and B but not between strains of these viruses; hence T-cell memory may provide future protection against infection by different strains of either influenza A or B.

The symptoms and time course of the disease are determined by interferon and T-cell responses and the extent of epithelial tissue loss. Influenza is normally a self-limited disease that rarely involves organs other than the lung.Many of the classic “flu” symptoms (e.g., fever, malaise, headache, and myalgia) are associated with interferon induction. Repair of the compromised tissue is initiated within 3 to 5 days of the start of symptoms but may take as long as a month or more, especially for elderly people.

To read more click on this link to the full article: Pathogenesis and Epidemiology of Orthomyxoviruses

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: